Sawdust Addict

Perfect Shop Layout

Perfect Shop Layout

Tight on work space? Here are some thoughts on ways you can gain some extra space in your garage or shop through a more efficient setup of your workbench, power tools and more.

Shared Space

If woodworking isn’t the only thing going on in your work space, it is important to keep the layout flexible. You can do this by dividing your space into zones. The garage shown here is a great example. One side provides storage for household items, while the other side is devoted to woodworking. Perhaps your garage or shop includes space where you can permanently house larger items like a workbench, a drill press, and a miter saw station, which you can use as a secondary work surface. It’s also an ideal place to use bench-top tools. Other (portable) items can be stored away when not in use.

Flexible Middle

The upside of a zoned arrangement is that it leaves plenty of room for the car. But, when the car is backed out, the space can be used to put larger power tools (table saw, jointer, drill press, etc.) to work. Outfit your tools with mobile bases and casters to make setting up shop easy. Then, when the work is done, simply park your tools back in place to make room for the car again.

Effective Tool Groups

Perhaps you have a dedicated workshop, but it’s small. Figuring out the best “combos” for grouping and arranging your tools will make your shop easier and more efficient to work in. The idea is to arrange your tools in small groups. Below we highlight a handful of solutions that may help you get more out of your shop space.

Central Workstation

Place your table saw and workbench back-to-back in the center of your workshop. That way, your bench can act as a large out-feed support for the table saw. Just make sure your bench is the same height or a bit lower than your saw. This makes it perfect for handling sheet goods. Another plus is that the combined size of the saw table and bench makes an extra-large glue-up and assembly station. Simplify Centers